Wednesday, October 15, 2008

a whole lot of nothing

that is what this election was, a whole lot of nothing. pretty much the same result (including rob anders and jason kenney, way to go calgary!) and it cost multiple millions of canadians' dollars. yippee.

though, working the election was quite interesting; i met a nice lady that i like to call mimi who was my poll clerk and we chatted about politics (even though i am sure you are not really supposed to) and religion and although we disagreed or saw things differently, i hope i opened her eyes a little so she can stop feeling sorry for muslim women.

it hurt my heart a little each time i had to read aloud 'harper' while we were counting the votes, but at least it is not a majority. and hello, ndp riding in alberta! go edmonton.

i must admit that the riding of calgary southwest is a lot more diverse than i ever gave it credit for and that made me happier. i was also proud when new canadians whipped out their crisp canadian citizenship cards (which the government should really make look prettier, like the maple cards) or when i had to explain the riding and party system to new voters. although the lowest voter turn out in canada's history is pretty much the most embarassing thing ever.

and, the whole system of going through people's identification reminded me handling the ugliest, dirtiest identity documents and financial statements when i worked at the salvation army one year. but it also reminded me of how fascinating i find it when you get a glimpse into people's lives through those same documents. call me nosy, i suppose.

now, back to focusing on the us presidential election, which promises to be a hell of a lot more interesting than ours.

3 comments:

Heather said...

A little disappointing. At least it wasn't a majority for the conservatives though...

lu said...

i totally agree. at least it staves off a conservative social policy, which is frightening to me and doesn't represent the canada i am proud to be from.

K said...

If it makes you feel any better, my mother had to read out "Anders" repeatedly.

I wonder how people who live in countries where voting is really difficult feel when they see our 58% turnout.